Call me Deacon Blues


Hello everyone!

My name is Kinza and I’m from Pakistan. This is my first year as an independent student in the external LLB programme. I thought it would be nice to start off with an introduction of myself in my first blog post.

Let’s begin with the educational aspect of my life. I have never been toKinza - indpendent student a school on a regular basis. Yes, you heard me right. The reason for this was that my father believed that schools, in fact, de-educate you rather than educate – especially considering the selection we had. When I was a child, I did go to school, but even that for sporadic instances – a pattern which would become ever looser, until being completely stopped after 8th grade when I started studying privately. While I wasn’t studying formally, I used to love to read books, mainly fiction, and those were, to me, a much-preferred alternative to textbooks (this is probably true even now, to be honest). Reading became a sort of informal education.  Continue reading

Breaking the mould: studying at 50


Here we are, the calendar says it is January 2018. For many, January is a slow reading a bookmonth, just getting back to normal, whatever that means. For us UoL students, it is a busy time. Exams just 5 months away and knowing you, that little panic button in your head is already flashing red.

January is also the time for reflection. Often you may ask, why on Earth am I doing this? Why do I subject myself to this particular kind of torture? These questions are more frequent if you are, let’s just say, more mature in age. I have been asking myself the same questions, and this year is more relevant than others. In a few weeks, I will reach a milestone birthday, yes the big 5-0. Here I am nearly 50 and still a student. I will not lie, it is not what it used to be, I cannot browse through a 600-page book in three days, now it takes me a week. Everything takes a bit longer, and finding the motivation is harder than it used to be. Continue reading

Behind the scenes of the Student Experience Survey video project


As part of ‘closing the feedback loop’ of the Student Experience SuJohn Ginman (Chair of the Learning, Teaching and Assessment Sub-Committee), responds to a question about assessment and courseworkrvey 2015—2016 we, as the Student Voice Group, helped to produce a series of videos that inquire about main areas of concern in the results, and show the internal workings of the University of London along with its commitment towards improvement. Four videos were produced in collaboration with the University, featuring SVG members posing questions to senior members of staff about academic support, the virtual learning environment (VLE), assessment and coursework, and communications.

Continue reading

Studying and depression


Depression is a mental illness that has been in the headliDepressionnes recently. I always think “mental illness” is a slightly derogatory term and just consider myself living with a long-term illness. That’s just me though and I don’t want to (and won’t) get into a debate about the correct term to use. Certainly a significant number of students, at some time in their lives, have to face this illness. So I thought it might be worthwhile writing a blog from a “depressed student’s” point of view. Continue reading

Planning coursework


Before the end of the year I got coursework and things started to be assignmentserious as each coursework is 10% and the exam would make up 80% of my grade. When I have a clear understanding of it, it is time to put effort in the coursework. Continue reading

New Year equals new pressures but old resolutions


Dear Reader,

I’d be remiss if I do not start by wishing you a Happy New Year. And to fellow students, may you find the time to study and to complete your assessments on time, anResolutionsd, more importantly, may you pass your assessed assignments and final exams!

As I take one last look at something I vow to give up in 2018, I can’t help but also look around the corner at what’s ahead. For a lot of people, including me, January 1 2018 meant an opportunity to make New Year’s resolutions. But for me, and fellow students, it is really new pressures with old resolutions that were made in October, back when we registered for our course. 2018 means the time to crank up our studies to receive passing grades. So, it is only fitting to think of a New Year’s resolution in terms of passing the final exams! Continue reading

Reflections on 2017 based on my demography and health coursework


2017 has been what could be considered a memorable year in the AfricaPolitical map of African continent. For example, Robert Mugabe was ousted from power in Zimbabwe, and Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, first elected female head of state in Africa, led her country to a peaceful presidential election. While these are some considerable political events, and they are more noteworthy ones too that happened in the public health arena. The resurgence of cholera and measles, and high incidence of malaria that continue to kill countless numbers of children on a daily basis in many countries are all awful reminders of the impacts of diseases on human health in the African continent. Continue reading

There’s no victory in playing small


On December 6, US President Trump recognised Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. What has unfolded since: violence, protests, airstrikes and uncertainty for theDonald Trump Wall Art future of many people. I just returned from the region less than a week prior to the announcement. I was in Palestine (the West Bank) to direct a short film music video with local artists in collaboration with FilmLab Palestine and had meetings with local NGOs to discuss how we could collaborate on peace-driven projects for the region. Personally, I fear deeply for the lives of my colleagues and peers. Israel and Palestine can draw polarising reactions – especially now – but regardless of where your political, sociological or moral beliefs lie, it’s undeniable that it’s a wholly unsustainable situation and things need to change. Continue reading

The procrastinators guide to the holidays


Hello my fellow law students. I hope that your semester is proving fruitfuBuilding a snow fortl and that you’re making good progress in your modules. If not, do not fret, you still have plenty of time to get caught up. Here in Alberta (Canada) the holidays are in full swing causing endless disruptions to my study regime. Although Christmas isn’t actually until the 25th its celebration starts in late November and is probably the most disruptive of all holidays to one`s study. Continue reading

Staying motivated


I have been struggling to stay motivated in my studies lately. I promised myself that this year would be different.

I only took one paper last year. I gave myself plenty of excuses and good reasoDesk with books, highlighters and listsns to only take one paper… I was too busy, I wasn’t sure if I could do the full degree so if I did the introductory paper only, I could get a certificate and call it a day if I realised this was not for me… and so on. Truth to be told, I was too scared of failing. I was covering my bases in order to comfort myself once the time came… Surprisingly enough, I did better than I expected and even more surprising, I enjoyed myself… A LOT. Continue reading