Processing Exam Results And Farewell, My Fellow Peers!


Having been so busy studying all the time, I was already in my third year when I discovered the University of London International Programmes Official Student Blog and decided to join the clan of student bloggers. My first post on the Official Student Blog was ‘Beginning of the End’ in September 2015, and here I am writing my farewell post, for it has been around eight months since I have outgrown the term ‘student’.

My journey as a student blogger has been wonderful and I recommend all students out there, no matter what year you are in, to give it a try. One gets to connect with other students of the University of London all around the world. Writing down what you are feeling not only makes you feel lighter but sharing your experiences with other students is a small way of helping each other out as well. Not only that, reading your peers’ blog posts makes you feel better about not being the only one going crazy around exam time, and helps you get through your time as a student. Sometimes, reading up on posts that are not related to studying can be refreshing and can give your mind a break from constant studying.

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Journey update: Being Confident In Your Exam Preparation


walker in empty spaceMy examinations are over.

It is hard to believe, and right now I feel a bit lost. Suddenly my mornings are free, and although I have a to-do list for the forthcoming months (a pretty long one), there is some weirdness in this sudden lack of structure. I wanted to write here in part to counteract that feeling, but also to share with you some words of encouragement.

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Are You Behind in Your Studies?


Man at deskWhen writing fiction an author has two ways to create a sense of tension and urgency in a reader and set the pace of the story. One is a time lock. The other is an option lock. A time lock means the character has X amount of time to accomplish Y and avert the consequences. It’s a race against the clock. An option lock means the character has to make a choice between two or more options to achieve their goals and avert disaster. If you are feeling behind in your studies, chances are the narrative around your dilemma contains an element of both time and option locks.

Writing science says that groups of people respond in different ways to each kind of lock, but more about that another time. For those of us engaged in post-graduate study I think the two get conflated. To solve the option/time lock we have to answer two simple questions. How much time do I have to prepare, and if I do option A, B, or C what results will I get? The consequences and looming potential for disaster are self-evident. So, how do I assemble my resources and move past the time/option lock that inevitably comes before exams?

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Study tools I find useful – Time to shift gears and nail the exams!


Study tools-books and pens2017 has been an extremely eventful year and the first three months have flickered by in no time, but more about the eventful things later! The onset of April means, for most of us students, exams are around the corner. This is by no means my intention to set in ‘testophobia’ amongst all of us taking the University of London examinations. On the contrary, this serves as a perfect occasion for me to share some tools that have proved beneficial!

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Methods to Help Revising and Studying for Exams


Study hard and dont give upWhen I was as young as six or seven, someone once told me: “Each of us is given 24 hours a day, and it is in your hands how you want to make full use of these 24 hours”. These aren’t the exact words, I’m pretty sure about that. But three decades on, the gist of the philosophy is still etched in my mind. The embarrassing thing is this, I can’t remember who this person is. Whoever the person is, he/she sure sounds like an authoritarian to me now I think about it. Why would an adult decide that he/she should impart this time management wisdom to a six or seven year old kid? I guess he/she must have felt so revolted by how, as a child, I spent my time so insensibly. Quite frankly, as an adult now, they still seem to be the kind of activities that a child should rightly be doing – sticker collection, bookmark collection (which I am still collecting today), hopscotch, Pac Man etc.

Well, I’m glad that I remembered what he/she said but forgot whoever the person is. Didn’t they say that we should remember only the good things in life?

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Ethics: A practical application of philosophy


Ethics sign postOne of the most common criticisms of philosophy is that it’s not ‘practical’; that is, the study of philosophy doesn’t require students to learn anything useful. I strongly disagree with this charge, of course. For those who are studying philosophy develop many highly valuable ‘meta-skills’, such as those required by activities involving careful analysis and clear communication, that can be applied directly to countless specific endeavors. But there’s one area of philosophy that’s immediately practical par excellence, for it’s concerned with the choices we all make every day of our lives. This, of course, is the study of ethics.

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How to prepare yourself, practically and emotionally, for an examination


Exam desksI feel I should congratulate us all, we are one step closer to our goal – Graduation! The examination period is the most academically stressful period. At this time of year, we have to prove to teachers and, most importantly, ourselves that we have done well all year long. To help us get through this difficult time, I have developed some techniques that personally help me, not only during exams but all year long.

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My Life Philosophy


graphFinancial markets have always been fascinating for me. I started reading André Kostolany when I was a teenager and after many books, I felt as if I knew everything about market psychology. Of course, I did not! Fortunately, I had no money to speculate with at that time.

But to be prepared for the day I would have the resources, I continued reading from world experts and renowned academics. It was only a matter of time until I came across the name George Soros, who studied at the London School of Economics (LSE). His “Theory of Reflexivity” combined psychological aspects and business cycle theory. During his lecture series at the Central European University, he explained how his life philosophy, derived from Karl Popper’s “Open Society and its Enemies,” helped him to succeed financially, but also personally in his philanthropic work. I became immediately interested in Popper’s work and read it myself during a time when I had lost my focus.

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Structuring Answers to Exam Questions


I’m sitting behind a mountain of study materials trying to work out an effective revision plan.  For me, revising is not the same as studying. It requires a very different attitude and awareness about what I want to accomplish. When I have a good understanding of those goals, I can then develop a plan to approach my materials.

My study materials include primary texts and essential reading, recommended reading, study guides for each module, and my notes. That’s a lot of material to collate and use together effectively. You can see why a clear goal about outcomes is very helpful. So how do I start?

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Enlist the help of family and friends


Holding handsWith level 5 formative assessments already handed in and the looming date of formative assessment for level 4, it seems that the reality of examinations is sinking in. Perhaps you are already drafting your revision plans, or maybe you are still considering how to approach the task of organizing revision time to make the most of it.  In your plans, do not forget to take in to account the help you can get from family and friends. They are there not only to cheer you up, but they can also be an invaluable help to optimizing revision.

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