Making a Productive Start to 2017


Study guide bookletsTo all of you who spent the holidays blissfully ignoring the subject guides like me, the New Year rings in the realisation that there are hardly 4 months to the final exams. As 2016 begins to fade into a glimmer and we are faced with a lot of catching up in terms of study goals, I would like to share some of my strategies for coping with post-holiday time crunch.

I recently graduated with a B.A. (Hons) in English from University of London, under the academic direction of Goldsmiths, University of London. This year I continued with University of London because I loved the flexibility, academic excellence and engaging courses. I am currently doing the Graduate Diploma in International Relations, a course developed by London School of Economics and Political Science. Due to the immense mobility of the degrees offered by UOLIP, I am able to study wherever in the world and whenever I choose while also continuing my work in dance and social work. This year I am living in Montreal, Canada and I am able to continue my studies while applying for postgraduate programmes for a 2017 intake at the same time.

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Journey update: reacquainted with myself


Baby booties and a book

Two sides to one story

When I wrote my first post I told you that my main concern as an studying mum was making space in my brain for knowledge when the ups and downs with The Little One were barely leaving any space available in said brain. After more than a month of daily study I think it is about time to make an evaluation.

In the past few weeks The Little One was going through the “adaptation period” at daycare. She had to get used to new people, new food, new patterns, new rules… And it was a lot to take. Interestingly, this adaptation period is also designed to help parents in coping with the difficult feelings of leaving their progeny in the care of someone unrelated to the family circle. My mind wandered off easily and I asked myself repeatedly if she would hate me for “abandoning” her like that.

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The key to self-studying for a degree


the-harder-the-battle-the-sweeter-the-victoryNobody said that it is going to be easy. Anyone who grows up in a traditional education system would have the idea of pedagogy that naturally conjures up the picture of a classroom of students and a teacher. Nobody said that to acquire a degree through self-studying, without guidance, is going to be smooth sailing. However, no one has said that it is an impossible task either.

I believe that most of us in the UOL long distance program shoulder the same responsibilities: work, family and studies. As if to juggle these is not challenging enough, some of us have also taken the degree course without any additional help: we study without attending any local teaching institutions. A daunting task it is, but, we must not forget the one big perk that is attached to it – flexibility.

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How distance learning has helped me personally and professionally


Woman studying by distance learningLet’s really explore distance learning this week.  To my surprise, this is a topic I find myself discussing quite a bit. Every day I find myself in conversations like: “What is distance learning really like? How do we implement it? What kind of results can we expect to see? What kind of measurements are best applied to our particular distance learning program?” I talk about it at work, in social settings, during board meetings and in job interviews.  Keep in mind that I do not work in education at all, not even remotely. (No pun intended)  Distance Learning is now that important.

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The Beginning of a Journey: the Student Mum


Mulerthal, Luxembourg

Mulerthal, Luxembourg

Five years ago, if someone had told me that I was going to live in Luxembourg and raise a baby girl while studying English with the UoL International Programmes, I probably would have laughed. Yet here I am: a Spaniard based in Luxembourg studying English and, yes, raising a baby at the same time (six months now and going strong!).

The truth is I studied to become a teacher back in Spain. I got my teaching degree there but life brought me to this little country and, after a while, I decided to enroll in the International Programmes to widen my knowledge in English. Continue reading

Rekindle that Flame


Cartoon of person readingLast month, I talked about the importance of taking a break; the benefits of my temporal relief of a knotty problem encountered in any aspects of life, including studying. No matter how pressing a matter might seem to be at a moment, it always does me immense good when I pry myself away, so that I can return to it rejuvenated and ready to tackle it afresh.

So, what is the next stage following the “chilling” method? How did I get myself warmed up to the tons of reading that have piled up since the day I signed up for the modules of the next academic year?

I call this next stage the “thawing” method. It is when I immerse my mind in a semi-ready mode, or when I do not want to be switched off completely, while preparing myself to return to serious studying.

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Difficulty in maintaining beneficial study habits…


Good day my fellow colleagues!

My apologies for not writing for some time. It’s been quite busy at work.

I trust that everyone was satisfied with their exam results. If you weren’t, I urge you to apply my motto:

“There are two things you can do with an exam, you can either pass or fail, and if you fail, then simply re-write it!”

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Behind the scenes @ Senate House


In Stewart House Reception with Student Affairs Manager Huw Morgan-Jones.

In Stewart House reception with Student Affairs Manager Huw Morgan Jones.

More than three years have rolled by in a flash from I enrolled with the University of London International Programmes, as a student of BSc Accounting and Finance, under the academic direction of the LSE. Since then I have experienced the troughs and crescents of life – from changing my stream of study from Accounting to International Relations, witnessing the tragic death of one of my aunts, taking immensely challenging and rigorous exams, attending demanding lectures at the LSE and the SOAS summer schools, performing Indian classical music at SOAS, to even trying a hand at punting in the River Cam (which by the way was almost a flop)! With the results of my third year of study being declared (and which I am quite happy about), it feels a bit surreal to think I am onto my fourth and final year of study with the University of London and LSE. Back in India after spending one of my most productive and busiest times in London, I must confess that getting to tour the Senate House – the nerve centre of the International Programmes has been highly inspiring.

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Making a good start with Mathematics and Statistics


Hello readers.LSE Study guides

Today’s conversation marks roughly one year since I started collaborating with the Official Student Blog. To celebrate the event, I titled this post after my very first one, the subjects involved being obviously different.

I’m sure many newly-enrolled students in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences (EMFSS) programmes will have to take a combination of Mathematics 1, Mathematics 2, Statistics 1, and/or Statistics 2. With this in mind, why not share with you some general information about those units? Even prospective students might find it useful.

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My Path to a UOL LLB Hons Degree


This guest post is written by Hamza Khaleel, who graduated with an LLB in 2016.

It was November 2011. I had been marriedImage of law books for one year and my wife had an offer to study a Masters at the University of Malaya in Malaysia while I had discovered the University of London LLB programme that would give me the academic knowledge and edge to work in the social, justice and human rights fields of the Maldives. I was desperate to find the means to support the both of us to study abroad as there were no proper university degree programmes in the tiny island nation of the Maldives. We got our savings together and decided to take the risk of having merely enough funds for one year for the both of us. Our plan was for us to work while studying as much as we could.

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