My essay roadbook


So, 3 years into this degree and the thing that still drives me nuts is essay writing. It takes me months to start writing answers that I am halfway happy with. Anyway, I hope this resonates with you all. If it does, keep reading ‘my roadmap to essay writing’, the steps I usually go through to write a Politics/International Relations Essay.

Step number 1: Getting my head around the material.

Before I can even think about an essay, I have to study the material. Usually thiStudys involves going through the Study guide and the Essential Reading. Whether I write the essays as I go along or wait till I finish the syllabus, it depends on the module and how well I understand it. Continue reading

It’s all about the Plan


I love planning, it makes everything seem right in a highly topsy-turvy world where surprises are always lurking around the corner. concept-1868728_1280.jpg

Here are a couple of things I like to do when I am studying my politics modules. Take a look, I hope that they help you too!

Understanding what’s expected of me

When I started this degree my first step was to sit down and read all those lovely resources that UOL offer, explaining how the degree worked and what was expected of us as students. Understanding this helped me to understand what I had to do and when I had to do it; the Strategies of Success book gives a really nice overview of the different kinds of plans students should make. Continue reading

Planning coursework


Before the end of the year I got coursework and things started to be assignmentserious as each coursework is 10% and the exam would make up 80% of my grade. When I have a clear understanding of it, it is time to put effort in the coursework. Continue reading

A busy professional’s guide to learning


In my last blog “It is a long road ahead but it is worth it” I talked about what motiLearning is not attained by chancevated me to return to study and my struggle in finding the course that I am passionate about. Having passed that stage, “the motivational stage” as I call it, it is now time to get into “the reality stage” because, as Abigail Adams said, “Learning is not attained by chance; it must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence.” This, one might say, is where the rubber meets the road. Continue reading

The “big picture” plan


Having ana blog oct 2017a study plan is one of the first things that enters our mind when we decide to study, and even more if we do so as International Programmes students. We think in terms of time allocation, ascertaining when we will be able to sit down with our books, juggling many other commitments, perhaps thinking that it is not worth planning study sessions if our lives are so hectic that we are lucky with an hour left for studying. Continue reading

Apps and tools to boost study skills


As UoLIP students, we may feel like we are left to our own devices Clock icontoo much, and sometimes we struggle to organize ourselves, find material or muster the motivation to accomplish our goals. Luckily, we live in an era where having Internet access means finding a solution to almost any problem, and student life can be easily kept on track with the help of a myriad of apps and web pages designed to overcome the most common problems of a student. Yours truly has gathered this manageable list in the hopes that you may find something useful in it.

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The reality of your first year at university.


Expectations versus realityHello I am Janathri Weeratunga and I am from Sri Lanka. I am currently a 2nd year LLB student with the University of London International Programmes. As many students, I too started my first year straight after my A/Ls and I was pretty enthusiastic (at least in the first few months). I was a newbie to law and I thought that it would be as easy as any A/L Art stream subject (which was a big mistake). My whole concept of university life and higher education was pretty much based on English novels found at any bookshop in Sri Lanka. So of course, without any doubt, I was imagining hard work, long walks, a bit of romance, fun and a load of new friends.

However within a few months of lectures I was forgetting all the hard work and just simply enjoying life on campus and my new found freedom. It is of course very easy to get carried away with the whole concept of “University” and the life there and I did learn my lesson in the hardest way possible. So I am writing this post now just to make sure that all of you first years know exactly what you are getting into. Trust me; an undergraduate degree in Law does require a lot of hard work . If you do not put in those long hours of work you will regret it in August when results come. We are about 3 months away from what I would describe as the most competitive exams I have ever faced.

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