Politics: Yay or Nay?


I can’t believe that it’s nearing the end of 2018. 2 years ago, I was at the end of my A Levels, trying to decide what to do next.young-791849_1280

I knew I wanted to do something that stretched my brain and allowed me to develop my analytical skills. In the end, it was between a math degree and a politics one. I chose politics and I haven’t regretted it since.

I’ll admit that every year, as that dreaded exam time comes closer and I see the stack of notes that I have to get through, I do wonder why I didn’t take at least one math course. Saying that, I have yet to sit down and have a serious urge to change degrees and do something else with my life. As I enter the third year of my degree, none of this has changed (yet) and here’s why. Continue reading

Beginning my (hopefully) last year


Today I am here to talk about a deep belief that has been shaped by my studies and my experience as an independent student. You will not find a real piece of advice in this post, only something that I feel worth sharing with you from the bottom of my heart.

As many other students here, I first chose the BA English because I love love readingreading/literature/books. Many of you have experienced the thrill of having a gazillion of doors and windows to other worlds, and in some measure, it is that thrill which has driven you to choose these studies. Continue reading

Regression, motivation and call of duty


I am writing this article to motivate other students to try their best and never give up. I am a person who started this degree at the University of London with not the highest knowledge of math and statistics. However, with my persistence, my hard work sI can do thattudying and my determination, I was able to reach a decent level of knowledge of those quantitative fields. This year, I have chosen to study development economics and in the first chapter it was indicated that I should revise some regression techniques. So, I tried to search in my old statistics textbook. At first I was terrified. I thought econometrics was a very difficult topic and I would not understand. However, I am a person that never gives up at anything. So, I closed my books and I hit the gym, I cleared my mind and I came back to study some more. I watched a lot of videos on youtube about regression and I finally got it. It took me some extra time, but I did get it. Finally! Continue reading

A Personal Reflection


As I reflect upon the journey that has, hopefully, just ended, and while I await the result of my rigorous efforts, the relentless march of Time has already separated Pradeep in his study spaceme by two months from the submission date of my final project of the SFP module in the Master of Science in Professional Accountancy (MPAcc) degree. The pain has somewhat lessened and I can now view, through a perspective infused with nostalgia, the many moments that consumed me entirely.

In my seventh decade, I may have, by a blip, increased the average age of the student cohort, comprising mainly of young, ambitious, career-minded individuals, sacrificing their present consumption wisely in favour of a rosy future. What reason can I have for subjecting myself to the same sacrifice? Perhaps a rosy future? Not really! The motivations that propel us beyond securing life’s basic necessities cannot always be measured according to the Laws of Logic. Continue reading

Learning takes no vacation – do a MOOC


Education has been increasingly more democratised by the internet and more broadly through digitisation. This has given us, the eager minds of the world, the great opportunity to explore the causes of things at minimal costs. Opportunities range from deepening one’s own skill set and knowledge or exploring a completely unfamiliar field of science and develop personally.spiderman readin

I believe there are basically three different reasons for learning: (1) develop the theoretical base for your chosen subject, (2) develop hard (i.e. technical) skills for your chosen industry, and (3) develop soft skills through interdisciplinary courses and courses outside your chosen field. Studying the theory required for our desired industry is what most of us do at the University of London. This is the very foundation and starting point for the rest of our journey. But it certainly does not end here. Continue reading

Studying – experience ‘of’ or ‘for’ a lifetime?


That’s a good question isn’t it?

Last year, when I was considering enrolling in the MSc in Professional AccountanLearncy, I thought about this question a lot. I already graduated twice, I am in full-time employment and I am a fully qualified ACCA accountant. The value of returning to Higher Education wasn’t that obvious.

In Higher Education, are we just reading recommended books and articles and submitting assignments and when it’s all over, time for work? Or are we primarily doing this as preparation for the world of work? As such, do we learn to learn for life? Continue reading

Up next: The Upside Down


There are 24 hours in a day. 25 of which I have spend staring at my books.desk and notebook

In my city, Mumbai, India, summer vacations for most have already started. College students as well as kids frolic around in the blazing sun while attempting to catch the last drop of their ice creams. While some are catching flights into relaxed oblivion, I am here wiping my sweat with my notes.

UOLIA EXAMINATIONS 2018: Countdown begins. Continue reading

Why take notes?


Do you read a lot? Most days, I read until my eyes bleed then spend the rest of my time writing. Studying law is reading and writing intensive, which, for me, is one reason for taking notesbeing in the program.  I also read and write professionally in nonprofit work and publish creative fiction. Full disclosure: my natural facility is with numbers and spatial reasoning, but I love words and language. That means constantly coaching myself to think and learn using words. It also means I might have to work a bit harder to improve my verbal capacity. Each day I’ve got to process quite a bit of information the best I can, and then reorganize it verbally. It’s taken a while to develop a strategy to do that and to speed up my efforts. Continue reading

How to de-stress before examinations


Much is said here about writing essays, motivating yourself, making the48 days until 1st examination most of your notes and other essential stuff for the daily life of a student. But sometimes, our best intentions and plans fall short of one key thing: how to manage all that under the pressure of an upcoming deadline, examinations in this case. During the highly stressful period of examinations, we start second-guessing ourselves, over-spread our efforts, or focus too intensely on just one thing, etc. To ace your examinations you need self-control and peace of mind as much as you need to prepare the right amount of material in sufficient depth. 

I have a few strategies that help me to keep my sanity almost intact through the whirlwind of emotions and information that the examination period brings. Here I list a few. Continue reading

Train your mind


The purpose of education is two-fold. Firstly, to make us knowledgeable about a subject, which allows us to apply what we’ve learned later on in our lives. And secondly, to inculcate a mental sophistication which refines our thinking capabilities. One of the reasons we chose the University of London is because we believed in the quality of its education and its ability to do both of those things.   books on a shelf

Yet, unfortunately, most of us don’t do one of the major parts of the carefully designed curriculum: the readings. I admit, there are hundreds of them, and, especially to a new student, they can seem quite intimidating. Unfortunately, what most of us do instead, is either skim or not read them at all in order to cover our courses quickly. I too have to read constantly in order to try and keep up. And that’s exactly why this topic appealed to me: why were so many of us not willing to commit to such an essential part of the course and yet expect to do well in the exams and later as professionals. Continue reading