Up next: The Upside Down


There are 24 hours in a day. 25 of which I have spend staring at my books.desk and notebook

In my city, Mumbai, India, summer vacations for most have already started. College students as well as kids frolic around in the blazing sun while attempting to catch the last drop of their ice creams. While some are catching flights into relaxed oblivion, I am here wiping my sweat with my notes.

UOLIA EXAMINATIONS 2018: Countdown begins. Continue reading

Why take notes?


Do you read a lot? Most days, I read until my eyes bleed then spend the rest of my time writing. Studying law is reading and writing intensive, which, for me, is one reason for taking notesbeing in the program.  I also read and write professionally in nonprofit work and publish creative fiction. Full disclosure: my natural facility is with numbers and spatial reasoning, but I love words and language. That means constantly coaching myself to think and learn using words. It also means I might have to work a bit harder to improve my verbal capacity. Each day I’ve got to process quite a bit of information the best I can, and then reorganize it verbally. It’s taken a while to develop a strategy to do that and to speed up my efforts. Continue reading

How to de-stress before examinations


Much is said here about writing essays, motivating yourself, making the48 days until 1st examination most of your notes and other essential stuff for the daily life of a student. But sometimes, our best intentions and plans fall short of one key thing: how to manage all that under the pressure of an upcoming deadline, examinations in this case. During the highly stressful period of examinations, we start second-guessing ourselves, over-spread our efforts, or focus too intensely on just one thing, etc. To ace your examinations you need self-control and peace of mind as much as you need to prepare the right amount of material in sufficient depth. 

I have a few strategies that help me to keep my sanity almost intact through the whirlwind of emotions and information that the examination period brings. Here I list a few. Continue reading

Train your mind


The purpose of education is two-fold. Firstly, to make us knowledgeable about a subject, which allows us to apply what we’ve learned later on in our lives. And secondly, to inculcate a mental sophistication which refines our thinking capabilities. One of the reasons we chose the University of London is because we believed in the quality of its education and its ability to do both of those things.   books on a shelf

Yet, unfortunately, most of us don’t do one of the major parts of the carefully designed curriculum: the readings. I admit, there are hundreds of them, and, especially to a new student, they can seem quite intimidating. Unfortunately, what most of us do instead, is either skim or not read them at all in order to cover our courses quickly. I too have to read constantly in order to try and keep up. And that’s exactly why this topic appealed to me: why were so many of us not willing to commit to such an essential part of the course and yet expect to do well in the exams and later as professionals. Continue reading

How to stay motivated while studying


Hello, I am Ruby from the Seychelles Islands. I am a second year law student. For my first blog, I would like to share some of the things I do to stay motivated while studying.Ruby in the Seychelles

Interestingly, the word “motivation” derives from the latin word “movere”, which means “to move”. Thus, when thinking about motivation, it is good to ask two questions “What moves me to study?” and “What moves me to persist in studying?” Perhaps the answer to the first question is the value we attach to obtaining a degree, or the interest we have in the subject, or it may well be the feeling of accomplishment that comes with graduating. While it is important to understand what motivates us to study, this blog post will focus on the second question “What moves me to persist in studying?”, in other words, how I stay motivated to study. Continue reading

Approaching my study materials


Here are some words to live by: try never to live anywhere with a season called ‘mud.’ It was a typical late winter weekend in South Western Pennsylvania which mbarn and pony in the snoweans we had nine inches of snow here in the Laurel Mountains on Saturday and Sunday. Now, on Tuesday, it’s close to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. The streams and rivers are gorged with snow melt.  Our pasture moved well beyond spongy and water-logged under my feet to something like gooey chocolate pudding. Even the horses and my dog are happy to gaze longingly at the soupy fields from our perches in the barn and tack room where I’ve taken to studying.  We’re patiently waiting for mud season to pass and everything to turn summer-green. Continue reading

Studying and depression


Depression is a mental illness that has been in the headliDepressionnes recently. I always think “mental illness” is a slightly derogatory term and just consider myself living with a long-term illness. That’s just me though and I don’t want to (and won’t) get into a debate about the correct term to use. Certainly a significant number of students, at some time in their lives, have to face this illness. So I thought it might be worthwhile writing a blog from a “depressed student’s” point of view. Continue reading

New Year equals new pressures but old resolutions


Dear Reader,

I’d be remiss if I do not start by wishing you a Happy New Year. And to fellow students, may you find the time to study and to complete your assessments on time, anResolutionsd, more importantly, may you pass your assessed assignments and final exams!

As I take one last look at something I vow to give up in 2018, I can’t help but also look around the corner at what’s ahead. For a lot of people, including me, January 1 2018 meant an opportunity to make New Year’s resolutions. But for me, and fellow students, it is really new pressures with old resolutions that were made in October, back when we registered for our course. 2018 means the time to crank up our studies to receive passing grades. So, it is only fitting to think of a New Year’s resolution in terms of passing the final exams! Continue reading

Reflections on 2017 based on my demography and health coursework


2017 has been what could be considered a memorable year in the AfricaPolitical map of African continent. For example, Robert Mugabe was ousted from power in Zimbabwe, and Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, first elected female head of state in Africa, led her country to a peaceful presidential election. While these are some considerable political events, and they are more noteworthy ones too that happened in the public health arena. The resurgence of cholera and measles, and high incidence of malaria that continue to kill countless numbers of children on a daily basis in many countries are all awful reminders of the impacts of diseases on human health in the African continent. Continue reading

The procrastinators guide to the holidays


Hello my fellow law students. I hope that your semester is proving fruitfuBuilding a snow fortl and that you’re making good progress in your modules. If not, do not fret, you still have plenty of time to get caught up. Here in Alberta (Canada) the holidays are in full swing causing endless disruptions to my study regime. Although Christmas isn’t actually until the 25th its celebration starts in late November and is probably the most disruptive of all holidays to one`s study. Continue reading