Studying and depression


Depression is a mental illness that has been in the headliDepressionnes recently. I always think “mental illness” is a slightly derogatory term and just consider myself living with a long-term illness. That’s just me though and I don’t want to (and won’t) get into a debate about the correct term to use. Certainly a significant number of students, at some time in their lives, have to face this illness. So I thought it might be worthwhile writing a blog from a “depressed student’s” point of view. Continue reading

New Year Equals New Pressures but Old Resolutions


Dear Reader,

I’d be remiss if I do not start by wishing you a Happy New Year. And to fellow students, may you find the time to study and to complete your assessments on time, anResolutionsd, more importantly, may you pass your assessed assignments and final exams!

As I take one last look at something I vow to give up in 2018, I can’t help but also look around the corner at what’s ahead. For a lot of people, including me, January 1 2018 meant an opportunity to make New Year’s resolutions. But for me, and fellow students, it is really new pressures with old resolutions that were made in October, back when we registered for our course. 2018 means the time to crank up our studies to receive passing grades. So, it is only fitting to think of a New Year’s resolution in terms of passing the final exams! Continue reading

Reflections on 2017 based on my demography and health coursework


2017 has been what could be considered a memorable year in the AfricaPolitical map of African continent. For example, Robert Mugabe was ousted from power in Zimbabwe, and Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, first elected female head of state in Africa, led her country to a peaceful presidential election. While these are some considerable political events, and they are more noteworthy ones too that happened in the public health arena. The resurgence of cholera and measles, and high incidence of malaria that continue to kill countless numbers of children on a daily basis in many countries are all awful reminders of the impacts of diseases on human health in the African continent. Continue reading

The procrastinators guide to the holidays


Hello my fellow law students. I hope that your semester is proving fruitfuBuilding a snow fortl and that you’re making good progress in your modules. If not, do not fret, you still have plenty of time to get caught up. Here in Alberta (Canada) the holidays are in full swing causing endless disruptions to my study regime. Although Christmas isn’t actually until the 25th its celebration starts in late November and is probably the most disruptive of all holidays to one`s study. Continue reading

Staying motivated


I have been struggling to stay motivated in my studies lately. I promised myself that this year would be different.

I only took one paper last year. I gave myself plenty of excuses and good reasoDesk with books, highlighters and listsns to only take one paper… I was too busy, I wasn’t sure if I could do the full degree so if I did the introductory paper only, I could get a certificate and call it a day if I realised this was not for me… and so on. Truth to be told, I was too scared of failing. I was covering my bases in order to comfort myself once the time came… Surprisingly enough, I did better than I expected and even more surprising, I enjoyed myself… A LOT. Continue reading

A humanitarian worker’s practical reflections on the coursework


In my last blog entitled “A Busy Professional’s Guide to Learning” I ended it with a quote by Alfred Mercier, who said that “What we learn with pleasure, we never forget.” After using this quote, I thought that it could be a cliché. After all, learning is hard work and how can it be pleasurable too? Isn’t this an oxymoron? Perhaps, Mr. Mercier was speaking of some other forms of learning, one which does not involve my Demography and Health coursework, with its formulas and a lengthy glossary of terms, and so on. For a first-year MSc student, this coursework has been everything but a pleasure. Continue reading

What did first month of study teach me?


This is my 4th week in university, slowly and gradually starting to adapt to university routine. University is definitely a whole new level for me, it’s actually a hybrid of secondary school and polytechnic. Continue reading

It is a long road ahead but it is worth it


Issa - student bloggerThe wise Lao Tzu said that “The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” That step for me was to decide three years ago that I wanted to go back to school. Why? I asked myself one evening as I sat in a hotel room in Guinea capital city of Conakry, in the middle of the worst Ebola Virus Disease. Unlike many, my desire to go back to school was not motivated by the need to boost my career or to earn another degree. I have a good job and Master Degrees from two world-renowned institutions of higher learning. Why did I decide on that full moon night in December 2014 to return to study after a long time off?

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A day in my study schedule


Breakfast

In my last blog post we talked about “Big picture” planning so, to complement it, I thought you may like to read about how I organize myself on a daily basis during weekdays. Perhaps you can get refreshing ideas!

This schedule relies heavily on my own preferences, habits and circumstances as a student. For example, I prefer working in the mornings because I know it is easier for me to focus then. Remember how important it is to know yourself in order to devise a suitable schedule for you.

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Better late than never


Better late than never: Spencer JohnsonHave you ever thought about age becoming an obstacle for us to study at the university again? I was concerned whether I’ve left it too long to study for a bachelor’s degree as I am 21, which is an age most students obtain the degree. I am sure that many of you have heard this worry before, but I believe now that it’s never too late to start again. Here’s my brief story before I enrolled at the University of London.

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