Beginning my (hopefully) last year


Today I am here to talk about a deep belief that has been shaped by my studies and my experience as an independent student. You will not find a real piece of advice in this post, only something that I feel worth sharing with you from the bottom of my heart.

As many other students here, I first chose the BA English because I love love readingreading/literature/books. Many of you have experienced the thrill of having a gazillion of doors and windows to other worlds, and in some measure, it is that thrill which has driven you to choose these studies. Continue reading

The surprising similarity between studying the LLB and learning to drive a van


We, as humans, always seek to challenge ourselves; to exceed our tText Bookshresholds in the hope of becoming better; to make a difference or simply to chase a dream.
When I embarked upon my journey to study the LLB programme at the University of London, my first thoughts were: ‘Finally, after completing a foundational degree in Business Management and dedicating myself to my daughter, it was time to reward myself; it was time to focus on my dreams.’ Continue reading

Reflections on 2017 based on my demography and health coursework


2017 has been what could be considered a memorable year in the AfricaPolitical map of African continent. For example, Robert Mugabe was ousted from power in Zimbabwe, and Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, first elected female head of state in Africa, led her country to a peaceful presidential election. While these are some considerable political events, and they are more noteworthy ones too that happened in the public health arena. The resurgence of cholera and measles, and high incidence of malaria that continue to kill countless numbers of children on a daily basis in many countries are all awful reminders of the impacts of diseases on human health in the African continent. Continue reading

A humanitarian worker’s practical reflections on the coursework


In my last blog entitled “A Busy Professional’s Guide to Learning” I ended it with a quote by Alfred Mercier, who said that “What we learn with pleasure, we never forget.” After using this quote, I thought that it could be a cliché. After all, learning is hard work and how can it be pleasurable too? Isn’t this an oxymoron? Perhaps, Mr. Mercier was speaking of some other forms of learning, one which does not involve my Demography and Health coursework, with its formulas and a lengthy glossary of terms, and so on. For a first-year MSc student, this coursework has been everything but a pleasure. Continue reading

Better late than never


Better late than never: Spencer JohnsonHave you ever thought about age becoming an obstacle for us to study at the university again? I was concerned whether I’ve left it too long to study for a bachelor’s degree as I am 21, which is an age most students obtain the degree. I am sure that many of you have heard this worry before, but I believe now that it’s never too late to start again. Here’s my brief story before I enrolled at the University of London.

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Now that it’s over: Reflections on my CertHE experience


Looking backI was extremely busy from January to April preparing for my CertHE in English exams that I did not post to the UoL student blog during this period. Now I have completed my exams and enjoyed a period of rest, I think it is a good time to reflect on the period that has passed and write about it. My CertHE was a testing time for me, but I am glad to say that I have no regrets about going through the process.

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