Politics: Yay or Nay?


I can’t believe that it’s nearing the end of 2018. 2 years ago, I was at the end of my A Levels, trying to decide what to do next.young-791849_1280

I knew I wanted to do something that stretched my brain and allowed me to develop my analytical skills. In the end, it was between a math degree and a politics one. I chose politics and I haven’t regretted it since.

I’ll admit that every year, as that dreaded exam time comes closer and I see the stack of notes that I have to get through, I do wonder why I didn’t take at least one math course. Saying that, I have yet to sit down and have a serious urge to change degrees and do something else with my life. As I enter the third year of my degree, none of this has changed (yet) and here’s why. Continue reading

There’s no victory in playing small


On December 6, US President Trump recognised Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. What has unfolded since: violence, protests, airstrikes and uncertainty for theDonald Trump Wall Art future of many people. I just returned from the region less than a week prior to the announcement. I was in Palestine (the West Bank) to direct a short film music video with local artists in collaboration with FilmLab Palestine and had meetings with local NGOs to discuss how we could collaborate on peace-driven projects for the region. Personally, I fear deeply for the lives of my colleagues and peers. Israel and Palestine can draw polarising reactions – especially now – but regardless of where your political, sociological or moral beliefs lie, it’s undeniable that it’s a wholly unsustainable situation and things need to change. Continue reading

A humanitarian worker’s practical reflections on the coursework


In my last blog entitled “A Busy Professional’s Guide to Learning” I ended it with a quote by Alfred Mercier, who said that “What we learn with pleasure, we never forget.” After using this quote, I thought that it could be a cliché. After all, learning is hard work and how can it be pleasurable too? Isn’t this an oxymoron? Perhaps, Mr. Mercier was speaking of some other forms of learning, one which does not involve my Demography and Health coursework, with its formulas and a lengthy glossary of terms, and so on. For a first-year MSc student, this coursework has been everything but a pleasure. Continue reading