Spirit of continuity


Countless hours of sleeplessness, anxiety, struggling to read, reading and thinking critically have paved the way for a fresh round of challenges, which I look up to. The finals have long been over and I hope to have done well. The post examination experience has deceived me of my expectations of a hollow feeling of having nothing to do. Instead, it has urged me to start my mental preparations for the journey ahead.

Besides the mental preparations, fatigue has accompanied me in the form of a delightful trip to Mumbai, tucked in between attending a SOAS students’ reception right after the exams, writing the IELTS exam just for the sake of testing myself, which I happily passed with flying colours, a trip to my hometown of Burdwan  after almost six months and accompanying my Gurujee on the taanpura at the prestigious Tolly Club in Kolkata. To say the least, I have highly relished this hectic schedule so far. Amidst all of the post exam rush, a stream of thoughts has kept gurgling in the background of my mind. These thoughts have predominantly been regarding what it means to be a graduate of the University of London and being associated with the LSE. That I will be graduating from the University of London in a few weeks has made me do a bit of research about what the university stands for.

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To Read or Not to Read, Is that the Question?


Study booksThroughout the past four years of my time as a student of the University of London, I have spent the best part of my summers mulling over reading lists. Don’t you all anticipate the new stationary, new books and new reading lists when exams still seem aeons away? The first day of holidays right after my last exam, I have downloaded the subject guides quite as if on autopilot. It has given me a rush of joy and immense satisfaction to discover in advance what the coming academic year holds for me.

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Post-Exams: What Next?  


Exams are finished Now that I am done with my exams, like many of you must be, my post-exam routine is a go-to activity. It is a ritual that I have perfected over the course of four years studying two different degrees through the University of London. The primary goal for this meditative process is to achieve a closure with the previous academic year. It always allows me to move on to the next task with a fresh perspective.

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Bridging the Gap Between Exams and Results


Last examHello readers!

I put our next conversation in the form of an interview, its topic being “what to do in the time after our last exam and before we receive our results“. The content doesn’t exclusively reflect my own experience but I mostly drew from discussions with friends and myself. Hope the exchange will provide you with supplementary ideas on how to spend a fruitful break after exams. Although I made their names up, Davide acts as the imaginary interviewer while Enrico plays the imaginary student-interviewee.

Without further ado, I leave the stage to our two speakers.

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Study tools I find useful – Time to shift gears and nail the exams!


Study tools-books and pens2017 has been an extremely eventful year and the first three months have flickered by in no time, but more about the eventful things later! The onset of April means, for most of us students, exams are around the corner. This is by no means my intention to set in ‘testophobia’ amongst all of us taking the University of London examinations. On the contrary, this serves as a perfect occasion for me to share some tools that have proved beneficial!

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My Life Philosophy


graphFinancial markets have always been fascinating for me. I started reading André Kostolany when I was a teenager and after many books, I felt as if I knew everything about market psychology. Of course, I did not! Fortunately, I had no money to speculate with at that time.

But to be prepared for the day I would have the resources, I continued reading from world experts and renowned academics. It was only a matter of time until I came across the name George Soros, who studied at the London School of Economics (LSE). His “Theory of Reflexivity” combined psychological aspects and business cycle theory. During his lecture series at the Central European University, he explained how his life philosophy, derived from Karl Popper’s “Open Society and its Enemies,” helped him to succeed financially, but also personally in his philanthropic work. I became immediately interested in Popper’s work and read it myself during a time when I had lost my focus.

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Time management during examinations


Wall clockHello readers!

I hope your studies are proceeding well and as expected. As we head toward exams, I’d like to share a few ideas with you.

In a previous post, we briefly discussed a plan of action to start our academic year.

However, that post looked at planning from a long-term perspective and focused on how to begin the study phase; that is, a phase of accumulation and selective storage of information or, borrowing from that very same post, the base of the pyramid.
But, you might ask, are those considerations valid if we had to plan the next two or three hours in a matter of minutes? In other words, can we apply the same logic to the ultimate phase of our annual project, to the top of the pyramid?

If so, how can we plan our time during an examination to make the most of it?

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How exercise benefits cognitive ability


Woman running‘No pain, no gain’ a few of my friends at the gym tell me. Some people like to train with weights, others with gymnastic machines, while others are simply training with aerobic exercises. But they all want to feel healthier and definitely look better after some months of exercising. We all know some of the benefits exercise can provide us. One is the significant reduction of the risk of cardiovascular diseases, strokes and so on. Exercise can also reduce insulin resistance and some researchers have shown that regular exercise can reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Behind the scenes @ Senate House


In Stewart House Reception with Student Affairs Manager Huw Morgan-Jones.

In Stewart House reception with Student Affairs Manager Huw Morgan Jones.

More than three years have rolled by in a flash from I enrolled with the University of London International Programmes, as a student of BSc Accounting and Finance, under the academic direction of the LSE. Since then I have experienced the troughs and crescents of life – from changing my stream of study from Accounting to International Relations, witnessing the tragic death of one of my aunts, taking immensely challenging and rigorous exams, attending demanding lectures at the LSE and the SOAS summer schools, performing Indian classical music at SOAS, to even trying a hand at punting in the River Cam (which by the way was almost a flop)! With the results of my third year of study being declared (and which I am quite happy about), it feels a bit surreal to think I am onto my fourth and final year of study with the University of London and LSE. Back in India after spending one of my most productive and busiest times in London, I must confess that getting to tour the Senate House – the nerve centre of the International Programmes has been highly inspiring.

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Making a good start with Mathematics and Statistics


Hello readers.LSE Study guides

Today’s conversation marks roughly one year since I started collaborating with the Official Student Blog. To celebrate the event, I titled this post after my very first one, the subjects involved being obviously different.

I’m sure many newly-enrolled students in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences (EMFSS) programmes will have to take a combination of Mathematics 1, Mathematics 2, Statistics 1, and/or Statistics 2. With this in mind, why not share with you some general information about those units? Even prospective students might find it useful.

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