Time management during examinations


Wall clockHello readers!

I hope your studies are proceeding well and as expected. As we head toward exams, I’d like to share a few ideas with you.

In a previous post, we briefly discussed a plan of action to start our academic year.

However, that post looked at planning from a long-term perspective and focused on how to begin the study phase; that is, a phase of accumulation and selective storage of information or, borrowing from that very same post, the base of the pyramid.
But, you might ask, are those considerations valid if we had to plan the next two or three hours in a matter of minutes? In other words, can we apply the same logic to the ultimate phase of our annual project, to the top of the pyramid?

If so, how can we plan our time during an examination to make the most of it?

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How exercise benefits cognitive ability


Woman running‘No pain, no gain’ a few of my friends at the gym tell me. Some people like to train with weights, others with gymnastic machines, while others are simply training with aerobic exercises. But they all want to feel healthier and definitely look better after some months of exercising. We all know some of the benefits exercise can provide us. One is the significant reduction of the risk of cardiovascular diseases, strokes and so on. Exercise can also reduce insulin resistance and some researchers have shown that regular exercise can reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Behind the scenes @ Senate House


In Stewart House Reception with Student Affairs Manager Huw Morgan-Jones.

In Stewart House reception with Student Affairs Manager Huw Morgan Jones.

More than three years have rolled by in a flash from I enrolled with the University of London International Programmes, as a student of BSc Accounting and Finance, under the academic direction of the LSE. Since then I have experienced the troughs and crescents of life – from changing my stream of study from Accounting to International Relations, witnessing the tragic death of one of my aunts, taking immensely challenging and rigorous exams, attending demanding lectures at the LSE and the SOAS summer schools, performing Indian classical music at SOAS, to even trying a hand at punting in the River Cam (which by the way was almost a flop)! With the results of my third year of study being declared (and which I am quite happy about), it feels a bit surreal to think I am onto my fourth and final year of study with the University of London and LSE. Back in India after spending one of my most productive and busiest times in London, I must confess that getting to tour the Senate House – the nerve centre of the International Programmes has been highly inspiring.

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Making a good start with Mathematics and Statistics


Hello readers.LSE Study guides

Today’s conversation marks roughly one year since I started collaborating with the Official Student Blog. To celebrate the event, I titled this post after my very first one, the subjects involved being obviously different.

I’m sure many newly-enrolled students in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences (EMFSS) programmes will have to take a combination of Mathematics 1, Mathematics 2, Statistics 1, and/or Statistics 2. With this in mind, why not share with you some general information about those units? Even prospective students might find it useful.

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Relief, joy and pride.


Michael SeaverSo that’s it. All done. A BSc in Politics and International Relations. When I saw my exam results this week my reactions were relief (because I felt a bit glass-half-empty after the exams in May), joy (at getting three results over 70%) and pride at the overall First Class Honours degree I was awarded.

I won’t use the cliche “journey” but lots of aspects of my life have changed since I started the degree. Unlike full-time students that get sucked into the bell-jar of academia and pupate into “real world” graduates four years later, those of us studying through the University of London International Programmes have to blend studies with our daily realities. My academic studies – like many other distance learning students – was squeezed around the changing fortunes of one-and-a-half jobs, family commitments and curveballs like house moves.

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End of a journey.


Carmen quote about graduatingSo my results for my third year are out. As usual, they aren’t to my expectations. Actually, they were never to my expectations. This only goes to show that University of London is very unpredictable. Either that, or my expectations for my own results just generally suck. Haha. Anyhow, good thing is I passed every single subject.

This means that I graduated from University of London International Programmes with a Second Class Uppers.

The fact that I graduated means a lot of me. It means that I have finished a hard race. Reached the finish line. It means that I survived and thrived in this course. Yes, I did it. I actually did it. We did it. We graduated! Our hard work paid off. A job well done!

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How to plan your studies


PlanningHello readers and colleagues!

I know… it’s been a while since our last conversation but I’m back with some potentially interesting thoughts for you.

How to plan your studies? How to make sure we begin the new academic year in the best possible way? It sounds like a subjective matter but there are some general considerations that apply to almost all of us.

We should take advantage of this relatively quiet period – academically speaking – to carefully devise a basic plan. In my brief experience, I learnt the earlier we start planning (i.e. structuring our studies), the better our results and the more enjoyable the journey.

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Finals have ended.


Keep calm. Breathe and focus.My last papers have come and gone.

For now, I have finished.

I am certain that there are some people that haven’t finished yet.

To those people I say, hang in there. It’s almost over. Just make sure to do your best.

Keep calm. Breathe and focus.

Here are some tips for how I handle myself in the last few hours before the exam.

For the day before the exam, I read lightly and just do my best to go through some past years’ questions quickly. I don’t like to stress myself out before the exams so I read lightly. Mostly, I focus on trying to calm myself because I tend to get stressed rather easily. This works for me. But if you feel like you can and want to read more or practice more, go ahead. My tips are just how I handled it and I just want to share it out to see if other people might find them useful.

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Final month tips


Well, there is less than a month to our exams. hourglass-silhouetteI just received my admission notice recently. I am sure everyone is filled with jitters. Personally, I am filled with jitters. Especially so when I realise that with each passing day, my exams are one day closer. It’s quite scary to know that your exams are so close and you still feel rather unprepared.

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European Union?


Hailed as the most successful model of regional integration,1 the EU’s unity is challenged on economic, political, and – perhaps most importantly – social grounds. Thriving extremist parties, uncoordinated responses to migration, barbed-wire-fenced frontiers, Schengen Agreement suspension, day-to-day “misunderstandings” between member states, and a pivotal referendum to be held in the UK next June threaten the Union’s stability as well as its so often praised common fundamental values. In short, a region crumbling under the weight of potentially irreconcilable differences between members. Strikingly, all of this ignores recent fights over the Euro, which would make things even worse.

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