Being more productive: Transcendental Meditation


I’ve never been a religious nor a spiritual person. This is why I was always sceptical towards things like meditation which is perceived to have a spiritual origin. For somindfulnessme people, meditation leads to inner peace and happiness while others might think of it as a placebo.

When I went to New York City during the Fall semester in 2017 to pursue a business certificate in finance, I took an additional course in organisational behaviour where we learned about the effects of meditation within an organisation. Research shows that it can increase productivity and reduce the risk of burnout. Then, a professional instructor went through a full meditation with us. The technique that was used was different from the one I want to recommend to you, but I still felt peaceful and relaxed in that moment. As any sceptic, I thought it might be a placebo effect since we heard about the research shortly before the meditation. Continue reading

Trials and tribulations of student life – dealing with disappointments


“In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity” (Albert Einstein)

I hope that this academic year goes plain sailing for all students. However, it won’t be long before we start getting our first marks and it won’t be long before our expectationEinstein quotes are challenged.

Nobody feels great when things don’t go the way they planned. And it is sometimes difficult to come to terms with that situation. We start asking questions: “Who, how, what went wrong?” “Am I to blame or is it someone else’s fault?” “How do I get back on track?” Continue reading

Waiting for the results – dedicated to those who believe in me


We are slowly heading to the day results will be announced. Most of us have mixed feelings. I can personally feel a sense of relief but, also, I feel stressed. I try not to think negatively. I think it is crucial for all of us to enjoy our summer vacations, to refill our batteries and relax. Whatever has happened, it’s over now! Whenever I feel stressed and under the weather, I try to remember an old Chinese saying “Don’t worry about things that can change and things that cannot be changed!” Continue reading

Interpreting your results


My, my… It’s been already two weeks since my last examination, and I am still all bubbly Process over Outcomewith the information gathered throughout this year, in which I attempted three modules instead of my usual two. I bet a lot of you are feeling the same, maybe with a bit of regret mixed in (“why did I not start earlier?” “I should have read that author”, etc.).

However, do not let the regret take hold of you, rather, take advantage of that spur to action by evaluating your past year. To gear yourself towards interpreting your results, the first thing you should do is make a fair evaluation of your efforts: did you encounter any difficulties this year? Was your planning too tight/too loose? Did you spread your efforts evenly across all your modules? These questions and many more can offer you a valuable view of your learning style as a student, and the input can then be used to improve your efforts next year. Continue reading

Up next: The Upside Down


There are 24 hours in a day. 25 of which I have spend staring at my books.desk and notebook

In my city, Mumbai, India, summer vacations for most have already started. College students as well as kids frolic around in the blazing sun while attempting to catch the last drop of their ice creams. While some are catching flights into relaxed oblivion, I am here wiping my sweat with my notes.

UOLIA EXAMINATIONS 2018: Countdown begins. Continue reading

Sweet, sweet victory


Ana holding her baby's handOn the 18th I got my results. While I was very tempted to publish a post a few hours after having checked my results, in the end I decided to wait at least 24 hours to cool off and I am glad I did. My previous post felt a bit like I was bragging, and that was not my aim at all.

Well, here it goes: I have achieved my best grades up until now.

You cannot imagine how this feels to me: “Like victory”. Yes, sure, but it is a little bit more than that. At the beginning of the year I told you my studies had become a way to reconnect with myself. With a part of me getting blurred out by all the new feelings of maternity, my studies became the only thing that did not make me feel like a human pacifier or a teddy bear or just a plain old mattress to sleep on top of.

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Preparing for the emotional rollercoaster of awaiting exam results


Man holding sign saying 'lawyered'Have you seen the episode of ‘How I met Your Mother’ where Marshall is waiting to see if he passed the New York state bar exams?  The conflict is that he lost his password and can’t log into the candidate portal, which means he was to wait even longer to see if he passed or not. The writers did a masterful job building suspense and tension. If you are waiting for exam results, you might feel the same way. Everything is on the line while you wait.

Sometimes waiting for results feels more stressful than taking exams, but no matter, all you can do is sit tight.  I try to keep calm, but for the first few weeks that’s virtually impossible.  Here is how I have learned to cope.

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Processing exam results and farewell, my fellow peers!


Having been so busy studying all the time, I was already in my third year when I discovered the University of London International Programmes Official Student Blog and decided to join the clan of student bloggers. My first post on the Official Student Blog was ‘Beginning of the End’ in September 2015, and here I am writing my farewell post, for it has been around eight months since I have outgrown the term ‘student’.

My journey as a student blogger has been wonderful and I recommend all students out there, no matter what year you are in, to give it a try. One gets to connect with other students of the University of London all around the world. Writing down what you are feeling not only makes you feel lighter but sharing your experiences with other students is a small way of helping each other out as well. Not only that, reading your peers’ blog posts makes you feel better about not being the only one going crazy around exam time, and helps you get through your time as a student. Sometimes, reading up on posts that are not related to studying can be refreshing and can give your mind a break from constant studying.

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Relief, joy and pride.


Michael SeaverSo that’s it. All done. A BSc in Politics and International Relations. When I saw my exam results this week my reactions were relief (because I felt a bit glass-half-empty after the exams in May), joy (at getting three results over 70%) and pride at the overall First Class Honours degree I was awarded.

I won’t use the cliche “journey” but lots of aspects of my life have changed since I started the degree. Unlike full-time students that get sucked into the bell-jar of academia and pupate into “real world” graduates four years later, those of us studying through the University of London International Programmes have to blend studies with our daily realities. My academic studies – like many other distance learning students – was squeezed around the changing fortunes of one-and-a-half jobs, family commitments and curveballs like house moves.

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End of a journey.


Carmen quote about graduatingSo my results for my third year are out. As usual, they aren’t to my expectations. Actually, they were never to my expectations. This only goes to show that University of London is very unpredictable. Either that, or my expectations for my own results just generally suck. Haha. Anyhow, good thing is I passed every single subject.

This means that I graduated from University of London International Programmes with a Second Class Uppers.

The fact that I graduated means a lot of me. It means that I have finished a hard race. Reached the finish line. It means that I survived and thrived in this course. Yes, I did it. I actually did it. We did it. We graduated! Our hard work paid off. A job well done!

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