A Different Perspective


1272750693_9f5dd9759d_zHere in the USA we are celebrating the centennial year of the National Park ServicePresident Theodore Roosevelt along with leaders like John Muir, Charles Young, and Stephen Mather worked to establish the park system. Quite fortunately, though coincidentally, I just returned from a business trip to Yellowstone National Park. Yellowstone is an absolutely extraordinary place, inhabited for over 11,000 years by Native Americans and first protected in 1872 as a national park by President Ulysses S. Grant.  It is a fabulous place to see wildlife and is home to some of North America’s iconic species like Bison, Elk, Wolf and Grizzly Bears.  The change of scenery offered a welcome diversion, even if it was for business rather than pleasure. It reminded me how much a small change can provide a very different perspective.

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Postgraduate Laws Exams and the VLE


study essentialsIt has been a little hectic these last few weeks working to balance home, professional, and study responsibilities.  One of the most helpful things about self-directed study, especially at the postgraduate level, is the ability to manage my schedule and focus on shifting priorities. As we enter exam time, study and revision will become time management concerns. Now, as I settle in to law studies on this cold and rainy day, all of my essentials are beside me – my favourite notebooks and computer, the indispensable phone, a steaming espresso, and my sweet little dog.  Although I will not be sitting exams this time, it is a great time to learn from other students and become familiar with study resources.

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Study tips and exam preparation!


Philip Koonj BeharryMy fellow study mates!

Exams are soon upon us and so I have decided to take a break and tell you about my study pattern which worked for me during my LLB and seems to be working for me now as I read for my LLM. Hopefully it can assist you as well, especially those new to the University of London International Programmes (UoLIP).

By way of introduction, I am Philip Koonj Beharry, graduate of the UoLIP LLB programme, Class of 2012. I am currently an Attorney at Law in my home country of Trinidad and Tobago and I am also currently preparing for my first set of LLM exams with the UoLIP. My personal story can be found in this article on London Connection.

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Final month tips


Well, there is less than a month to our exams. hourglass-silhouetteI just received my admission notice recently. I am sure everyone is filled with jitters. Personally, I am filled with jitters. Especially so when I realise that with each passing day, my exams are one day closer. It’s quite scary to know that your exams are so close and you still feel rather unprepared.

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Getting involved in reviewing University of London MOOCs


Written by Tobias Tretter, Chair of the Student Voice Group (more detailed bio below)

Tretter photoshoppedWhat is a MOOC?

MOOC – the ordinary reader will ask himself what this abbreviation means and stands for. It was not any different for me then, when I heard these four letters for the first time, but I became acquainted with this new thing really quickly. MOOC stands for Massive Open Online Course. This says a bit more, but not everything. MOOCs are free online courses that are available to the public. The University of London (UOL) has started offering some on a platform called Coursera alongside other leading Universities from other countries, for example the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The University of London has already launched 23 MOOCs which have attracted more than one million participants worldwide. I recently had the opportunity to get involved in the review process for University of London MOOCs. Continue reading

How I chose to study in the PG Laws Programme


Since I have completed my first two weeks as a PG Laws student, I have had a chance to see how my reasons for enrolling match the reality of study. I have four principle reasons for enrolling. One is the quite common goal of pursuing a new career path. The other three might be unique and personal. I am studying law to improve my verbal skills, develop special knowledge of European history, and to reduce stress.book-841171_640
When my study materials arrived, it gave me a chance to dive into my course in Western European Legal History. The study skills materials that the university sends to new students are comprehensive and very helpful. My packet included the three books of essential reading for Foundations: Roman and canon law 500 -1100, the course study guide and the PG Laws handbook.

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European Union?


Hailed as the most successful model of regional integration,1 the EU’s unity is challenged on economic, political, and – perhaps most importantly – social grounds. Thriving extremist parties, uncoordinated responses to migration, barbed-wire-fenced frontiers, Schengen Agreement suspension, day-to-day “misunderstandings” between member states, and a pivotal referendum to be held in the UK next June threaten the Union’s stability as well as its so often praised common fundamental values. In short, a region crumbling under the weight of potentially irreconcilable differences between members. Strikingly, all of this ignores recent fights over the Euro, which would make things even worse.

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Jelly Bean and I officially enrolled in the PG Laws degree!


Jelly Bean the Highly Motivated Collie Dog

Jelly Bean the Highly Motivated Collie Dog

Well, we’ve done it. Jelly Bean and I have officially enrolled in the Postgraduate Laws Programme. Our registration is complete, our module is selected, and we have just passed a rainy evening downloading study guides and examiners’ reports. Although I did my best ETNJ planning, I have had a case of the butterflies since making the commitment to enrol in this exciting programme. Jelly Bean is a great listener, a comforting little friend for stressful days, and as you can see, she is highly motivated to get the reward coming after our training session. She is just the kind of study buddy you want to have around.

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Harnessing the hashtag – how this helped me devise my own method for preparing for exams


Since my last post about my trip to London last summer, a year has passed by with the jolly Indian winters filled with music and preparation for the upcoming May examinations which will be crucial for me.  A lot has happened in the world in the last four and a half months that is relevant to my studies, which I will write about in my next blog (hopefully really soon!).  Similarly to some of my co-bloggers, it was a Writingpersonal feeling that sharing some study techniques and addressing some study dilemmas may be of some assistance to me and may also help some of my fellow students.  Sitting for a 100 course module, Contemporary Sociology in a Global Age, two 200 course modules, International Organisations and Foreign Policy Analysis, and a 300 course module, Security in International Relations, has turned out to be quite a challenge. A syllabus spanning 48 chapters where every line counts, exhaustive readings and a lot of writing has been no docile pet to tame and will certainly not be one when I take two consecutive exams on the 11th and 12th of May.

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MA Education: Journey of a distance learner


MA Education blogger NidaBeing a bit of an old soul, the idea of transformative learning never appealed to me, and I in no way or form fit the profile of an autonomous learner. Instead, I always preferred to follow the directive of the typical white haired, corduroy blazer sporting, battered leather briefcase toting professorial figure. Under such guidance I was able to work feverishly towards adding an “outstanding” to my educational credentials. Hopefully satisfying my parents that I was indeed working towards someday generating a hefty return on the tuition fee investment they grudgingly funded.

However, when it came to doing a master’s, the exorbitant costs of studying and living abroad left me with no option but to pursue the distance learning route to achieve my educational goals. I spent several weeks researching and emailing dozens of universities – half of which I did not care to pursue on one pretext or the other, and the other half that deemed me academically or otherwise unworthy to enter their virtual realm. Finally,  a combination of fate, and getting my foot in the door right before the entry deadline, landed me at the helm of the University of London. Through the distance learning MA  in Education programme, I was able to finally become a student of the UoLIP, UCL AND IOE (now UCL Institute of Education), plus I got the coveted @ucl email address as a bonus.😇

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