Dealing With Exam Stress: Why you need Nightline in your life [video interview included]


It’s examinations time; one of the most stressful times of the year for us students. It’s an ever-increasing reality that more and more students are facing mental health challenges, and we can all use someone with a listening ear.

Are you feeling like this right now?

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We got this, fam: Revision


Exam season… One of the most stressful times of our lives – when we aren’t beintaking examsg tested metaphorically, but actually. We start our school year full of hope and motivation, gradually feeling like we might be losing both over the semester/year. In the end, all we can think about is the best way to express our knowledge of the subjects we have studied in our examinations.

This makes the time we spend revising the syllabus, and the method(s) we choose to do so, one of the most critical features of our success in examinations. During that time we must ensure we understand the course, can remember it on our own and can handle the psychological pressures associated with this process, especially if things aren’t going as well as we had hoped. Continue reading

Train your mind


The purpose of education is two-fold. Firstly, to make us knowledgeable about a subject, which allows us to apply what we’ve learned later on in our lives. And secondly, to inculcate a mental sophistication which refines our thinking capabilities. One of the reasons we chose the University of London is because we believed in the quality of its education and its ability to do both of those things.   books on a shelf

Yet, unfortunately, most of us don’t do one of the major parts of the carefully designed curriculum: the readings. I admit, there are hundreds of them, and, especially to a new student, they can seem quite intimidating. Unfortunately, what most of us do instead, is either skim or not read them at all in order to cover our courses quickly. I too have to read constantly in order to try and keep up. And that’s exactly why this topic appealed to me: why were so many of us not willing to commit to such an essential part of the course and yet expect to do well in the exams and later as professionals. Continue reading

Call me Deacon Blues


Hello everyone!

My name is Kinza and I’m from Pakistan. This is my first year as an independent student in the external LLB programme. I thought it would be nice to start off with an introduction of myself in my first blog post.

Let’s begin with the educational aspect of my life. I have never been toKinza - indpendent student a school on a regular basis. Yes, you heard me right. The reason for this was that my father believed that schools, in fact, de-educate you rather than educate – especially considering the selection we had. When I was a child, I did go to school, but even that for sporadic instances – a pattern which would become ever looser, until being completely stopped after 8th grade when I started studying privately. While I wasn’t studying formally, I used to love to read books, mainly fiction, and those were, to me, a much-preferred alternative to textbooks (this is probably true even now, to be honest). Reading became a sort of informal education.  Continue reading

Breaking the mould: studying at 50


Here we are, the calendar says it is January 2018. For many, January is a slow reading a bookmonth, just getting back to normal, whatever that means. For us UoL students, it is a busy time. Exams just 5 months away and knowing you, that little panic button in your head is already flashing red.

January is also the time for reflection. Often you may ask, why on Earth am I doing this? Why do I subject myself to this particular kind of torture? These questions are more frequent if you are, let’s just say, more mature in age. I have been asking myself the same questions, and this year is more relevant than others. In a few weeks, I will reach a milestone birthday, yes the big 5-0. Here I am nearly 50 and still a student. I will not lie, it is not what it used to be, I cannot browse through a 600-page book in three days, now it takes me a week. Everything takes a bit longer, and finding the motivation is harder than it used to be. Continue reading

There’s no victory in playing small


On December 6, US President Trump recognised Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. What has unfolded since: violence, protests, airstrikes and uncertainty for theDonald Trump Wall Art future of many people. I just returned from the region less than a week prior to the announcement. I was in Palestine (the West Bank) to direct a short film music video with local artists in collaboration with FilmLab Palestine and had meetings with local NGOs to discuss how we could collaborate on peace-driven projects for the region. Personally, I fear deeply for the lives of my colleagues and peers. Israel and Palestine can draw polarising reactions – especially now – but regardless of where your political, sociological or moral beliefs lie, it’s undeniable that it’s a wholly unsustainable situation and things need to change. Continue reading

The procrastinators guide to the holidays


Hello my fellow law students. I hope that your semester is proving fruitfuBuilding a snow fortl and that you’re making good progress in your modules. If not, do not fret, you still have plenty of time to get caught up. Here in Alberta (Canada) the holidays are in full swing causing endless disruptions to my study regime. Although Christmas isn’t actually until the 25th its celebration starts in late November and is probably the most disruptive of all holidays to one`s study. Continue reading

The survivor’s guide (part 1)


For my inaugural blog I thought I would convey some of the wisdomMy study work desk with laptop and monitor I have gained as a grizzled veteran of 7+ years of post-secondary education. As I embark on my second, hopefully final, year of the LLB program, the thing I would like to convey to you first-year students is that it is possible to pass all your classes without a rewrite and without a supporting institution.  Admittedly it may be harder for those of you without any post-secondary experience, but, I assure you, it can be done.  Yet if you are looking for a cheat sheet or shortcuts, you will be sorely disappointed: You will not survive without hard work and discipline.  That said, here are some tips and hints to help you as you embark on your studies. Continue reading

On my way to finding what I’m looking for


LLB student blogger JuditU2’s classic song I still haven’t found what I’m looking for is still as relevant as it was when the song originally came out. The sentence captures our relentless pursuit to find the one thing that makes us happy or fulfilled. I am the first to admit that I am still searching. That’s why I have embarked on a long and difficult journey to fulfil my childhood dream, to become a lawyer.

My lawyer friends may say, “oh no, you are crazy”, maybe I am, but this is what I want to do and have wanted for decades. I did start out as a law student back in the 20th century in Hungary, but adventure got in the way and I landed in Canada. I did try to get into law school here, but again adventure got the better part of me and I went to live in Israel. I spent nearly two decades there, having a very challenging but interesting life. I got accepted to law school in Israel too, but life got in the way, I had to leave the program even before I could start.

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The reality of your first year at university.


Expectations versus realityHello I am Janathri Weeratunga and I am from Sri Lanka. I am currently a 2nd year LLB student with the University of London International Programmes. As many students, I too started my first year straight after my A/Ls and I was pretty enthusiastic (at least in the first few months). I was a newbie to law and I thought that it would be as easy as any A/L Art stream subject (which was a big mistake). My whole concept of university life and higher education was pretty much based on English novels found at any bookshop in Sri Lanka. So of course, without any doubt, I was imagining hard work, long walks, a bit of romance, fun and a load of new friends.

However within a few months of lectures I was forgetting all the hard work and just simply enjoying life on campus and my new found freedom. It is of course very easy to get carried away with the whole concept of “University” and the life there and I did learn my lesson in the hardest way possible. So I am writing this post now just to make sure that all of you first years know exactly what you are getting into. Trust me; an undergraduate degree in Law does require a lot of hard work . If you do not put in those long hours of work you will regret it in August when results come. We are about 3 months away from what I would describe as the most competitive exams I have ever faced.

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