On Cutting The Gordian Knot


Gladiator's the Spaniard

Maximus contemplating a Level 6 Equities and Trust problem question (https://www.imdb.com)

“You should see the Colosseum Spaniard. Fifty-thousand Romans… watching every movement of your sword… willing you to make that killer blow. The silence before you strike and the noise afterwards. It rises. It rises up… like a storm. As if you were the thunder God himself.”

I am not cut from the usual sports fan cloth, to the extent that I don’t religiously follow a football team, give scant attention to the Tennis Masters, and am honestly not sure I could name more than an handful of NBA luminaries; but that is far from true when it comes to Formula 1 where you will see my relative indifference morph into something bordering on fanaticism. From as young as 5 years old, I can remember sitting with my father, and on something roughly amounting to a fortnightly basis, watching my heroes battle it out, lap after seemingly endless heady lap, to their ultimate victory, or at times their less than dignified demise. Continue reading

The surprising similarity between studying the LLB and learning to drive a van


We, as humans, always seek to challenge ourselves; to exceed our tText Bookshresholds in the hope of becoming better; to make a difference or simply to chase a dream.
When I embarked upon my journey to study the LLB programme at the University of London, my first thoughts were: ‘Finally, after completing a foundational degree in Business Management and dedicating myself to my daughter, it was time to reward myself; it was time to focus on my dreams.’ Continue reading

Have I lost my mind?


First off, thank you for stopping by my first blog. I am an 80’s baby born and raised in Canada at a time when girls proudly wore high-waist jeans with a WalkmanMiki clipped to our hip and frizzy bangs. A time when hip hop and rock music were awesome. A time when “twerking” was the twitch and jerk motion of spawning fish swimming upstream. I was an observant, introverted child with a vivid imagination who seldom missed the opportunity to state my opinion when an injustice occurred; from bullies picking on the underdog to negotiating my way out of detention.

Discovering a passion for law

After high school I went straight to college. I enrolled in the hotel management program with a friend. I had no passion for hotels and absolutely no interest in managing a Marriott one day. Before my second year commenced, I dropped out and bought a one-way ticket to the USA with seventy-five dollars and a dream. It was in New York and Continue reading

Dealing With Exam Stress: Why you need Nightline in your life [video interview included]


It’s examinations time; one of the most stressful times of the year for us students. It’s an ever-increasing reality that more and more students are facing mental health challenges, and we can all use someone with a listening ear.

Are you feeling like this right now?

Continue reading

We got this, fam: Revision


Exam season… One of the most stressful times of our lives – when we aren’t beintaking examsg tested metaphorically, but actually. We start our school year full of hope and motivation, gradually feeling like we might be losing both over the semester/year. In the end, all we can think about is the best way to express our knowledge of the subjects we have studied in our examinations.

This makes the time we spend revising the syllabus, and the method(s) we choose to do so, one of the most critical features of our success in examinations. During that time we must ensure we understand the course, can remember it on our own and can handle the psychological pressures associated with this process, especially if things aren’t going as well as we had hoped. Continue reading

Train your mind


The purpose of education is two-fold. Firstly, to make us knowledgeable about a subject, which allows us to apply what we’ve learned later on in our lives. And secondly, to inculcate a mental sophistication which refines our thinking capabilities. One of the reasons we chose the University of London is because we believed in the quality of its education and its ability to do both of those things.   books on a shelf

Yet, unfortunately, most of us don’t do one of the major parts of the carefully designed curriculum: the readings. I admit, there are hundreds of them, and, especially to a new student, they can seem quite intimidating. Unfortunately, what most of us do instead, is either skim or not read them at all in order to cover our courses quickly. I too have to read constantly in order to try and keep up. And that’s exactly why this topic appealed to me: why were so many of us not willing to commit to such an essential part of the course and yet expect to do well in the exams and later as professionals. Continue reading

Call me Deacon Blues


Hello everyone!

My name is Kinza and I’m from Pakistan. This is my first year as an independent student in the external LLB programme. I thought it would be nice to start off with an introduction of myself in my first blog post.

Let’s begin with the educational aspect of my life. I have never been toKinza - indpendent student a school on a regular basis. Yes, you heard me right. The reason for this was that my father believed that schools, in fact, de-educate you rather than educate – especially considering the selection we had. When I was a child, I did go to school, but even that for sporadic instances – a pattern which would become ever looser, until being completely stopped after 8th grade when I started studying privately. While I wasn’t studying formally, I used to love to read books, mainly fiction, and those were, to me, a much-preferred alternative to textbooks (this is probably true even now, to be honest). Reading became a sort of informal education.  Continue reading

Breaking the mould: studying at 50


Here we are, the calendar says it is January 2018. For many, January is a slow reading a bookmonth, just getting back to normal, whatever that means. For us UoL students, it is a busy time. Exams just 5 months away and knowing you, that little panic button in your head is already flashing red.

January is also the time for reflection. Often you may ask, why on Earth am I doing this? Why do I subject myself to this particular kind of torture? These questions are more frequent if you are, let’s just say, more mature in age. I have been asking myself the same questions, and this year is more relevant than others. In a few weeks, I will reach a milestone birthday, yes the big 5-0. Here I am nearly 50 and still a student. I will not lie, it is not what it used to be, I cannot browse through a 600-page book in three days, now it takes me a week. Everything takes a bit longer, and finding the motivation is harder than it used to be. Continue reading

There’s no victory in playing small


On December 6, US President Trump recognised Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. What has unfolded since: violence, protests, airstrikes and uncertainty for theDonald Trump Wall Art future of many people. I just returned from the region less than a week prior to the announcement. I was in Palestine (the West Bank) to direct a short film music video with local artists in collaboration with FilmLab Palestine and had meetings with local NGOs to discuss how we could collaborate on peace-driven projects for the region. Personally, I fear deeply for the lives of my colleagues and peers. Israel and Palestine can draw polarising reactions – especially now – but regardless of where your political, sociological or moral beliefs lie, it’s undeniable that it’s a wholly unsustainable situation and things need to change. Continue reading

The procrastinators guide to the holidays


Hello my fellow law students. I hope that your semester is proving fruitfuBuilding a snow fortl and that you’re making good progress in your modules. If not, do not fret, you still have plenty of time to get caught up. Here in Alberta (Canada) the holidays are in full swing causing endless disruptions to my study regime. Although Christmas isn’t actually until the 25th its celebration starts in late November and is probably the most disruptive of all holidays to one`s study. Continue reading