“school’s out (for summer)…”

August 27, 2015

Summertime, and the livin’ is easy
Fish are jumpin’ and the cotton is high
Oh, your daddy’s rich and your ma is good-lookin’
So hush little baby, Don’t you cry

Huckleberry Finn fishing

I was 11 years old when Alice Cooper’s anthemic rock classic School’s Out For Summer soared to number 1 in the UK charts and summers seemed considerably longer than they do these days… endless fishing trips to the local forest ponds, and only picnics and formless games of football seemed able to punctuate what was an otherwise seamless vista of possibility… And so I thought for what is in fact my eleventh blog on this wonderful blog site I would allow myself a similar degree of freedom  just perhaps occasionally dipping my toe into the lake to share with you some of the highlights of what has been a really wonderful summer scattered with some occasional reflections on time and possibility.

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Faith re-boosted at the LSE Summer School!

August 25, 2015

Blogger Budhaditya at the LSE Summer School.

The LSE Old Building

This ‘Friday’ was not one of the most common Fridays that are usually in store for me. Soon after rushing to my French class in the afternoon, it was time to brave the lashing quintessential Kolkata monsoons to attend a ‘mehfil’ where my guru Pandit Ajoy Chakrabarty would be demonstrating the importance of lyrics in classical Indian music. Mehfil’s are typically cozy Indian get-togethers where people come, not in huge numbers, for a event which are usually cultural ones. With my heart still in a daze pondering over the topic of discussion, my mind swiftly cuts in to the next thing in my schedule – a game of balancing sides which I have quite got used to playing. I would be flying to London to attend the LSE Summer School in a few hours. Packing was hardly done and the apartment was a complete mess, bearing not a great deal of comedy compared to the situation portrayed by Jerome K. Jerome in his novelReaching home in a dog tired state, there would hardly be scope for any kind of feelings to percolate and surface. However it did: it was a strange amalgamation of excitement, joy, fear, anxiousness, a gut feeling which was indicating that perspectives were going to be changed. Writing about my 2015 summer stay in London could be possible from a thousand different ways: as a travelogue, a poem, informing about the Summer School and counting. However, here I want to share with all of you about my experiences as a student of International Relations with the University of London and the LSE, as a humble student of music, and what I gained from the time.

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Making a good start with Introduction to Economics

August 17, 2015

Runners starting race

Dear readers,

This is my first post and will be hopefully followed by many others during my studies. My name is Oscar, I’m Italian, and currently pursuing the BSc in Economics and Finance.

I decided to join the blog since I felt I had to share my impressions and experiences with fellow students as well as actively discuss about subjects we’re studying and how these relate to our daily lives. I hope we’ll have engaging discussions along the way.

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Journey to Centre of Campus – Final Goodbyes

July 27, 2015

Photos of MSc Public Health student Jillian's time doing a blended learning module at LSHTM.

London memories…

My last blog entry entitled The paradox of time seemed like an appropriate segway to open and close my final blog on. As I’m sure most of you can relate to, time has flown by and it’s hard to conceive that October to June could be so shortly spaced together. For some students, myself included, the school year has not quite ended as we work towards finishing our thesis projects.

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Epidemiology for Zombies

July 20, 2015

LSHTM logoA man is going into space and at first he is excited by the prospect. As time moves closer to the launch date there is stress and anticipation before the rocket launch. Then we have lift off and soon the rocket is in space. The man looks down on Earth and, seeing the glow of the Earth, realises that it was all worth it in the end.

The rocket moves slowly away from Earth and the Earth becomes smaller and smaller, and the view from the windows darker and darker, until there is only black and the loneliness of an empty space. Fear sets in over whether the right coordinates are being followed and will the rocket crash into the sun.

This is how many people feel after starting a distance learning course and before and after exams. It is how I felt soon after starting my current job and meeting my colleagues which lead me to study with the University of London.

In this blog I am going to show you how you can make learning more enjoyable with wordplay, teach you some epidemiology terminology learned on the Epidemiology course, as well as how to cash in on a  Zombie outbreak.

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What is Knowledge?

July 15, 2015

The University of London International Programmes (UoL) has just begun releasing exam results for students who sat for exams in May. Suppose that on the day that results are released for your program, you access them in the way you’re officially instructed to by UoL, which involves entering your personal information into a UoL-supplied web form. You do precisely as you’re instructed, and as you pull your results up, you learn that you scored a 71 on exam X. ‘Excellent!’ you happily exclaim. And from this information, coupled with your awareness of the fact that all scores of 70 and over merit a first, you validly deduce,

(B) ‘I scored a first in exam X’.

Most of us, on the basis of the information provided above, would unhesitatingly say that you know that you scored a first on exam X. That is, we would ascribe knowledge of (B) to you. And the reason we’d be inclined to say that you have knowledge in this case is because you have excellent reasons for holding a true belief. For you validly inferred (B) from two powerfully supported premises, viz. (1) I scored a 71 on exam X (which is supported by the results you received, in a legitimate way, from a highly reliable source), and (2) all scores over 70 merit a first (which is supported by information received through legitimate sources like student handbooks etc.).

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How hard can it be?

June 27, 2015

life puzzleOver a month has passed since I finished taking my second year UoL exams. But this time was a bit different. I was not a BSc Accounting and Finance student anymore but a student of BSc International Relations. Not to drag this blog again into exams, I would say as minimum as possible regarding the exams. Admittedly, I could deliver as per my expectations and my preparations, though I don’t expect to achieve results to the best of my capability. Still, a notch above in performance compared to the previous year, and hopefully the results reflect it. This improvement may be attributed to me getting used to the environment of the UoL and the LSE. They have almost become my home and I need to fantasize hard to feel like an alien  – which I used to feel on joining the International Programmes during my very first days.

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